Bizhiki Slicing Tomato - Organic

×

Bizhiki Slicing Tomato - Organic

Lycopersicon esculentum
(75 days) Open-pollinated. Indeterminate. In this fast-paced world of rapid changes, who remembers Buffalo greenhouse tomato? We last carried it a decade ago and lamented its demise when breeder Enza Zaden dropped it. We also missed poking fun at a city whose weather we judged to be worse than ours. I was a tomato grower back then and have been searching ever since for a greenhouse tomato with the same fantastic flavor—that would do well in the Northeast. Ontario biodynamic farmer Cory Eichman, who has the same long memory, set to work selecting year after year from the original hybrid Buffalo for great taste combined with crack resistance. When he had met those criteria with a uniform bright red 3" globe-shaped open-pollinated tomato that holds its own with modern hybrids in the greenhouse, he renamed it Bizhiki, the Anishinaabe word for buffalo.


4050 Bizhiki - Organic
Item Discounted
Price
A: 0.2g for $2.75  
unavailable, supply unavailable
B: 0.4g for $4.00  
unavailable, supply unavailable
C: 1g for $7.00  
unavailable, supply unavailable
D: 2g for $10.00  
unavailable, supply unavailable
E: 10g for $25.00  
unavailable, supply unavailable
Log in
to start or resume an order

Additional Information

Preventing Late Blight

Dry conditions spare us some years, but late blight is here to stay, especially for field-grown crops. Cool temperatures, moist conditions, still air and lack of sunshine favor sporulation; spores can occur and advance in any condition of high humidity. LB might spread quickly... or not; wind-borne spores can travel hundreds of miles on storm fronts, but also can be baked into submission by the hot sun. Once LB lesions develop on your plants take immediate action to halt the disease in hopes of salvaging a crop. Our recommendations:

  • Where possible, use resistant varieties. Our search continues for a resistant main crop variety that meets our high standards for flavor
  • Try to find tolerant cultivars—use anecdotal evidence and experiment.
  • Grow your own tomato plants or buy locally grown seedlings. Avoid big-box seedlings. Know your farmer!
  • Do not use saved potatoes as seed stock. Purchase only new certified disease-free seed potatoes. Click here for more potato-related late blight info.
  • Plant in areas with full sun and few wind blocks. Avoid shade and moist environments. Facilitate air movement. Maintain high soil fertility.
  • If you choose to spray, have a plan and materials on hand, so you can make quick and timely application(s) when conditions indicate. Order supplies from Organic Growers Supply
  • Most market growers and many home gardeners now grow at least a portion of their tomatoes in high tunnels, which greatly reduces vulnerability though still requires vigilance.

Information Sources

Tomatoes

  • Days to maturity are from date of transplanting
  • 9,000 seeds per oz, 0.1 gram pkt ~30 seeds, 0.2 gram pkt ~60 seeds, 0.5 gram pkt ~150 seeds.

Culture: Usually started indoors Feb–April. Minimum germination soil temperature 50°, optimal range 60-85°. Transplant after frost danger has passed. Avoid using fresh manure as it causes lush foliage with few ripe fruits. Instead use generous amounts of well-rotted cow or horse manure or compost to boost plant vigor, and crushed eggshells or gypsum at the bottom of each hole for calcium. Heavy phosphorus needs. Respond well to foliar sprays.

  • Determinate (Det.) bush varieties may be staked, should not be pruned.
  • Indeterminate (Ind.) climbing varieties are customarily staked and pruned. Tomato experts Carolyn Male and Kokopelli’s Dominique Guillet both oppose pruning, arguing more abundant foliage provides more photosynthesis.

Good seed retains viability so we often commission two-year productions. Organically and sustainably grown seed was rinsed with a sodium hypochlorite solution to reduce risk of seed-borne disease. This treatment poses no health risks.

Saving Seed:: Saving tomato seed is easy! Remove stem-end and crush the fully ripe fruit into a container. Ferment uncovered for a few days until the slurry forms a moldy cap. Rinse in a fine strainer and dry seeds on a coffee filter. To ensure true-to-type seed, grow open-pollinated varieties and separate by 50 feet.

Diseases:

  • ASC: Alternaria Stem Canker
  • EB: Early Blight
  • F: Fusarium
  • GLS: Grey Leaf Spot
  • LB: Late Blight
  • N: Nematodes
  • SEPT: Septoria Leaf Spot
  • TSWV: Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus
  • TMV: Tobacco Mosaic Virus
  • V: Verticillium

Pests and Disease Remedies for Tomatoes

Early Blight shows up as drying and dying leaves at the bottom of the plant. EB can be managed culturally; should not result in significant crop loss. Mulching deters EB by reducing rain splash on foliage. Do not compost affected plants as EB can overwinter even on dead tissue.
Cultural controls: Rotation, avoid stressing plants, staking, minimize leaf wetness, mulching, indeterminate varieties are more resistant/tolerant, disinfect stakes & cages.
Material controls: Regalia, Actinovate, Cease.

Late Blight usually starts on the foliage of the plant. Early in the season, late blight infection shows as roundish lesions on leaves that uniquely will cross the center vein of the leaf. Later, blotches appear on stems. Still later, hard crusty lesions form on fruits. LB on tomatoes is not seed-borne and does not survive on dead tissue. Letting plants freeze on soil surface kills LB spores.
Cultural controls: Destroy cull potatoes & potato volunteers, avoid overhead irrigation.
Material controls: Regalia, Copper, Cease.

Septoria Leaf Spot can appear almost overnight. It is characterized by yellowing and small circular spots on older leaves. It can eventually spread to the entire plant in conditions of high humidity and temperatures. It can be spread by wind or carried on clothing and tools. Septoria can live over the winter on live tissue, so don't compost affected plants.
Cultural controls: Space plants for good air circulation.
Material controls: Regalia, Copper, MilStop.

Anthracnose
Cultural controls: Rotation, mulching, minimize plant wetness, staking, use compost.
Material controls: MilStop, Copper, Regalia, Cease

Tomato Hornworm
Cultural controls: Look for frass (droppings) and handpick. Eeeuww! Use a blacklight to find them. See if you can get the chickens to eat them.
Material controls: Bacillus thuringiensis subsp.kurstaki, Monterey Garden Insect Spray, Entrust.

Tarnished Plant Bug
Cultural controls: Floating row covers, good weed control.

Bacterial Canker, Spec and Spot
Cultural controls: Disinfect greenhouse materials & cages, farming tools & gloves, avoid overhead irrigation, don’t work crop when wet, rotate crops, use compost.
Material controls: Copper.

Germination Testing

For the latest results of our germination tests, please see the germination page.