Red Tinged Winter Looseleaf Lettuce - Organic

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Red Tinged Winter Looseleaf Lettuce - Organic

Latuca sativa
(60 days) A leaf lettuce for three seasons introduced by Beth and Nathan Corymb of Meadowlark Hearth who selected and multiplied it from heirloom seed they brought from Europe. The lofty loose 10–12" compact heads with slightly ruffled leaves are green in their centers and lightly tinged with bronze toward the leaf tips. Can be harvested at 8" for “one-cut” salad leaf. Red Tinged was a hardy survivor in staffer Roberta Bailey’s overwintering test, and Hildy Danforth of Shelburne, NH, said that “it was the best I’ve seen in my fall greenhouse and I’ve grown every lettuce with the word ‘winter’ in its name.” Sow to mature in fall or late fall, or start in fall to overwinter and rally for major production in spring. Turns quite bitter in heat, so not for summer production. Cold-hardy.


2786 Red Tinged Winter - Organic
Item Discounted
Price
A: 1g for $2.75  
New catalog listings coming in early December
B: 4g for $6.50  
New catalog listings coming in early December
C: 14g for $11.00  
New catalog listings coming in early December
D: 28g for $16.00  
New catalog listings coming in early December
E: 112g for $60.00  
New catalog listings coming in early December

Additional Information

Lettuce

  • All lettuce is open-pollinated.
  • 1 gram packet sows 25 ft; 2 grams, 50 ft; 1 oz, 500–700 ft. 700–1100 seeds/1g pkt.
  • Days to maturity are from emergence after direct sowing; for transplants, subtract 20 days.

Culture: Direct seed outdoors as soon as ground can be worked and repeat every 2 weeks for continuous supply. Or start indoors in March and at regular intervals thereafter for early transplanted successions. Optimal germination temperature range 40–80° though many varieties won’t germinate in soil temps above 75° and most shut down above 80°. Thin sowings frequently and ruthlessly to a final distance of 1' for full heads. Heavy nitrogen feeders.

Hardy. All save icebergs tolerate heavy frost. Fall and overwintered harvests are becoming standard practice. For summer harvest, select varieties carefully: bolting, bottom rot and tipburn are problems if a variety can’t take the heat! Using shade cloth can keep lettuce tender and sweet longer into summer. Sesquiterpene lactones produced in the latex render lettuce bitter when it bolts.

Saving Seed: Saving lettuce seed is easy! Leave spring-planted lettuce heads to bolt. Flowers will become white tufted seeds. Once dry on stalk, rub seeds off the plant into a paper bag. To ensure true-to-type seed, separate lettuce varieties by 10 feet.

Diseases:

  • BOR: Bottom Rot
  • DM: Downy Mildew
  • LMV: Lettuce Mosaic Virus
  • PM: Powdery Mildew
  • SC: Sclerotinia
  • TB: Tipburn
  • X: Xanthemonas

Pest: Aster Leafhopper (vector for Aster Yellows disease)
Cultural controls: control perennial broadleaf weeds near lettuce plantings, plow lettuce fields immediately after harvest.

Pest: Slug
Cultural controls: avoid mulch or nearby grassy areas.
Material: Sluggo

Disease: Bottom Rot
Cultural controls: rotate with grass-family green manures, plant in well-drained soil or on raised beds, more upright varieties escape infection.

Diseases: Downy Mildew, Grey Mold, White Mold
Cultural controls: rotation, reduce duration of leaf wetness, plant parallel to prevailing winds, use wide spacing, control weeds, use well-drained fields in spring and fall.
Material: Actinovate

Mini-heads

Mini lettuce heads are increasingly popular for wholesale accounts and winter harvests. Home gardeners with a succession of minis can reap quick single salads. You’ll find minis across the cold-hardiness and heat-tolerance spectrum. We’ve held these little class acts up against the expanding utility-patented mini-types and found comparable or better performance. While we do not intend to “go big” on tiny types, we add excellence as we find it. Here’s what we have so far: