Vermont Compost Perennial Blend™

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Vermont Compost Perennial Blend™

So many customers ask what to use for filling their raised beds or large containers, and we finally have an answer. Crafted by the soil experts at Vermont Compost, this blend meets our high standards. Coarser than potting mixes and formulated as a complete soil for organic cultivation of woody plants, shrubs, herbs, vegetables and flowers. As with any bed or container, periodic applications of quality compost are recommended. Contains manure compost, bark, granite, basalt, sphagnum peat, coconut coir, vermiculite, kelp meal, blood meal, gypsum and bone meal. Made in Vermont. Also available in 2 cubic yard totes. NEW!

MOFGA



8377 Vermont Compost Perennial Blend™
Item Discounted
Price
A: 6 qt (5 lb) $13.00
  MOFGA Approved
B: 40 qt (40 lb) $36.00
  MOFGA Approved
C: pallet 40 bags (2000 lb) $1190.00
  MOFGA Approved
($1011.50)
currently on backorder
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Additional Information

Organic Certification

Inoculants, soil amendments, fertilizers, livestock supplies and pesticides are labeled as:
OMRI: Organic Materials Review Institute. Most state certifying agencies, including MOFGA, accept OMRI approval.
MOFGA: Reviewed and approved by the Maine Organic Farmers & Gardeners Association Certification Services. Allowed for use on MOFGA-certified farms. Check with your certifier.
WSDA: Listed by the Washington State Department of Agriculture’s Organic Certification division for use in organic agriculture in Washington State. MOFGA has indicated that they will accept products on this list for their certification program. Check with your certifier.
Nat’l List: One-ingredient products on the NOP* List of Allowed Substances (subpart G of the Organic Foods Production Act, sections 205.601-606). Check with your certifier.
AYC: Ask your certifier. Has not been reviewed by a certifier, but the active ingredient is allowed. Ask your certifier.
Not Allowed: A few of the products we list are not allowed for organic production but we think they have a place in sensible agriculture and can be used when certification is not an issue.